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November 11, 2013

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Suzanne

Ditto to all 10!

Rosy Brewer

Great post and thanks for mentioning Diane's blog. I really enjoyed it. My husband has not retired (he's my toy boy) but he works at home so sort of the same thing. I find it funny that when people ask HIM what it's like having me around 24/7, it's more about him bothering ME!

Rosy

Tom Sightings

Great advice, and I agree with all but No. 4. Yes, you need your own interests and friends, and to spend some time apart; but it binds you together when you have the same basic daily schedule; go to bed at the same time and get up and have breakfast together. At least, I think so.

Greg

Great list! In June of this year I retired at 41 along with my wife, and we moved to Costa Rica. I had many concerns - I was used to working at least a 12 hour day; so not only was I not going to have the structure of my working life, but, for the most part, those hours would be spent with my wife. These first 4 months have been fine, but then again we are getting used to a whole new culture and doing that together is fun. I think your list will come very much in handy after this new has worn off.

Retired Syd

Greg: Congratulations--41! What an adventurous retirement you have planned. That seems like the kind of experience that can alleviate many of the usual post-retirement adjustments to full-time togetherness. There is so much that is new to both of you and always so much to talk about. Hope you are enjoying it!

retireby40

My wife was off work for 2 weeks and she drove me nuts. It's going to be hard when she retires.
A couple needs a lot of time away from each other. We'll have to figure out our own activities.

fred doe

Retirement only solves 50% of your problems:) Two years ago my wife Patty and I looked in to going our separate ways. Since we were always D.I.N.K.S with no bills and equal assets we decided to use a divorce attorney who specializes in arbitration divorce. It was the best $200 bucks we ever spent. If your going in with out emotion and your money is clear you'll come out with a renewed "LOVE". Maybe everyone should do it every ten years of marriage. I know Syd now everyone will think,"oh fred you old romantic"?

sue marquis bishop

So true.... as a former family therapist, transition issues must be negotiated... enjoyed your views on the adjustment couple must make... to do so has great rewards in living the new adventure with a familiar partner......
http://www.womenlivinglifeafter50.com

Retired Syd

fred: Sounds cheaper and faster than marriage counseling. Maybe you're on to something. (Although Sue might have a little something to say about that technique!)

Dennis

Prior to retirement, in addition to a financial plan, we also developed a personal and a couple's activities plan. The plan consisted of various interests and hobbies that we either already practiced or wanted to get into. Some of these "new" hobbies had a financial component that I would have to plan for and this would have to be dovetailed into the financial plan. The early days/weeks/months of retirement are quite satisfying. Its like a honeymoon of sorts. But despite the love you have for one another, you both need some alone time. Although we don't have a formal daily schedule of personal interests, we know we can retreat to our other loves and feel content at the intellectual and physical nourishment these provide.
So, a complete retirement plan must also include an activities plan for being together and on our own. At least, this was the case for us.

New at this

Liberal Syd - Since you suddenly feel the need to censor out my comments, this is my final one. I have been keeping up with your blog for one simple reason. And no, its not to wade through your many mind numbingly boring posts where your 9 liberal friends all dutifully respond, "great post"….Nope, the reason I've slogged through is that you are the only liberal I know who would both admit it and attempt to articulate the rationale.

As an open minded conservative, I've been open to the idea that perhaps I just don't get something - that somehow liberals might see something that I haven't. To generate conversation around this idea, I've shared my views on many topics in an honest effort to see how the other side frames their thinking.

But at the end of the day, despite how well the agendas are spun on any given topic, my experiment in Liberalism boils down to a simple belief system that cuts through just about any controversial topic with which the the government wrestles:

==> Conservatives adamantly believe it is wrong to steal.

==> Liberals adamantly believe it is wrong to steal, unless they think they can spend the stolen money "better".

Can't wait until the next election because the Liberal philosophy might feel good for the moment, but it is fundamentally wrong. And ironically, the fact that you have resorted to censoring my comments, confirms for me that you know I'm right - Interesting that you are afraid that some of your other readers may come to realize this also if left to think for themselves.

Good luck to you and your 9 followers.

New

Retired Syd

New: I'm sorry to hear that. I have enjoyed our debates. For the record, your arguments can stand perfectly well on their own merit. You are very intelligent and articulate. So it's totally unnecessary, and actually takes away from the merits of your argument, when you resort to name-calling.

Retired Syd

P.S. to New: Since I'm the only liberal you know "in real life", I'm happy to continue our exchange through email ([email protected]). That way we won't disturb the readers that really just come here to read mind numbingly boring posts about retirement topics.

fred doe

Syd: "New at This" has me confused. Aren't we talking about marriage and retirement? As a veteran and live long blue collar worker who with his darling wife worked our asses off and saved our money and paid our bills off before they where due even if it meant taking on part time jobs I don't understand? Didn't Ayn Rand cover this in any of her books? I'm so confused I'm just so confused? Help me out Syd. Because I like your blog I'm a liberal? Me so sad:(

Retired Syd

Don't worry fred, we will now return to our not-so-regularly scheduled program.

Diane N.

Thanks so much for the opportunity to be featured on your blog! I hope your readers enjoyed the article.
Diane. anewchapter-diane.blogspot.com

Tamara

I just want to go on record that I predicted this Syd. :-)

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